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  • Frame Rate Vs. Shutter Speed – Setting The Record Straight

    Thursday, May 17, 2012

    Here is a great article by Sam Morrill on the difference of Frame Rate vs. Shutter Speed. For all you DSLR video shooters this is great information to know.

    http://vimeo.com/videoschool/lesson/56/frame-rate-vs-shutter-speed-setting-the-record-straight

    “In this day and age of constantly changing gear and technology, there’s a growing set of vocabulary that we video creators are all expected to learn. With so much jargon being thrown around, it can be easy to forget certain concepts or confuse them for other ones. A prime example of this is demonstrated by the confusion between frame rates and shutter speeds. Let’s taken a minute to clarify.” – Sam Morrill

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    Posted by Danita in Cameras, Canon, Gear, Shooting Tips, Stock Footage || Comment Now ||
  • Viewing Our Footage Collection w/ IE8 or IE9

    Wednesday, August 24, 2011

    It has been brought to our attention that there are some compatibility issues when attempting to view videos on our site in Internet Explorer 8 and 9. There is a simple solution to this problem and we thought it would be be a good idea to post a step by step guide on how to work around it.

    If you try to view a video in on the preview page and all you get is a black screen on the video player then you will need to change your “Compatibility Settings” in the Compatibility Menu.

    First, you will need to make sure the “Command Bar” is activated, which houses several buttons such as the home page icon, rss feed icon, printer icon and the page, safety and tools drop down menus. Then you will click the Page drop down menu and select “Compatibility View Settings.” Once the pop up window opens, simply switch your settings to view all websites in “Compatibility Mode” and you’ll be all set.

    There are two different locations for this menu depending on if you are using Internet Explorer 8 or Internet Explorer 9, and you very well may have them arranged differently, but the menu bar will look the same.

    Use the screenshots below to help guide you to the Page drop down menu:

    Internet Explorer 8

    Internet Explorer 9


    We hope this helps! As with anything footage related, if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to shoot us an email at: footage@danitadelimont.com

    Happy viewing!

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    Posted by Dave in Stock Footage || 1 comment ||
  • New Accessories!

    Monday, February 14, 2011

    As with everything in the ever-expanding technology market, new gadgets are constantly coming out to make your shoot experience easier, more fun and more productive.  Here are a few of the newest accessories for your DSLR that I’ve gathered browsing the web since CES in Vegas last month.

    Electronic Follow Focus

    More info: Jag35.com

    Sony CML V-55 LCD Monitor

    More Info: Digital Newsroom

    iLED ONE

    iLED ONE from ikan on Vimeo.

    “ikan’s iLED ONE comes complete with a tungsten 60 degree flood bulb, shoe mount and an 
in-line power switch. Power supply is sold separately to give you the choice on how to power your light! 

The preferred power supply choice is the AC107, equipped with the BCA107 belt clip for your choice of Sony L or BP-U, Canon 900 or Panasonic D54 style batteries.  The perfect solution for ‘on the go’ lighting!”

    More Info: Ikan.com

    LCDVF for HDSLR Cameras


    More Info: LCDVF.com

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    Posted by Dave in Stock Footage || Comment Now ||
  • Danita’s Musings on Footage Topics

    Monday, January 10, 2011

    I’ve been contemplating the whole “footage subjects” idea now for some time. I’ve talked with clients to see what they have on the horizon (if anything) and in general here are my thoughts on the types of things you should keep in mind for footage subjects.

    First of all, think story ideas when they lend themselves to that.  Look at a topic and think “single” clip or “story idea.”  I’ve talked at length to textbook researchers and editors and they tell me that in the near future they’ll be incorporating footage links along with stills of the same subject.  Therefore, try to “double shoot” so you have both a clip as well as a still of a similar subject.  The idea is that the student will see a still shot in their electronic textbook, and then click on the footage link and see it in motion.  Teachers will also use this kind of technique when teaching in classrooms.  If any of you have kids in schools with Smart Boards, you’ll know what I mean.  The new schools have digital projectors and are hooked up to the internet so they often project the textbook (from password protected websites) while teaching and the video aspect will (hopefully) catch the attention of the students more than a still image will.

    With that said, think in terms of what kind of motion will show and teach our students about the natural world, world cultures, geography, math, etc.  Think about watching a grasshopper hop verses looking at a still image (Biology).  Think about a construction crane lifting and moving a very heavy object, or an escalator moving or a baggage conveyor belt moving (levers/pulleys/gears–Math books).  Think about traditional ritual, customs and ceremonies, dancers, rites of passage, (World Geography and/or Cultural Anthropology).  Try not to make your clips too long, so you are actually self-editing, but if you see a whole story that takes a few minutes, shoot it.  Clients can edit or cut the clips to their own needed length.

    You can come up with a million ideas really.  If you have any kids’ textbooks close at hand, thumb through them and you’ll see the kind of content they like.  It’s really not any different than all the other subjects you’ve been shooting in stills.  Just add the motion aspect to it, given the opportunity.

    Simple subjects too…a colored leaf falling to the ground in the Autumn, slowly floating down to the pile of leaves on the ground….  a babbling brook flowing over a rocky stream….palm trees blowing, weather in any form, waves crashing on a beach…

    In general, with editorial, you won’t need model releases, but if you have someone up close and personal doing something, even smiling or blowing a kiss to someone or the camera, you should try to get releases.  Think of someone licking their lips, smooching the air, high fiving someone, tossing a penny, taking a walk,

    maybe a couple from the back holding hands as they walk somewhere….or kids doing the same.  The subjects are endless.  Also when traveling in Europe look for French people greeting each other with kisses to each cheek or Italians talking with their hands (foreign language textbooks).  Regarding travel footage, just shoot the destination in a way that would appeal to travel clients trying to seduce someone to their country or culture.  More and more travel clients are moving towards on-line website marketing and/or e-blasts with links in them.  Motion is used more and more with travel destination marketing.  Just short clips are fine–10-30 seconds on a subject that you’re shooting stills of, adds another dimension to your offerings.

    I will say too that many agency colleagues have told us that they’re not selling much footage “yet” which is the key word.  If we position ourselves with content, then we can have it available as more and more clients move into those kinds of needs.  Our plan is to distribute through our sub-agents in other world markets as well, so we can get as much mileage as we can on the footage.  It’s a lot of work for everyone so we need to get it as many places as we can and be in a position for sales when people really start looking.  This is definitely a long term process. Remember too, that if you have elements in your photos or footage that represent a time and place, they will date much faster.  Nature is pretty much timeless, but people with certain hair or clothes styles or cars on the street will not last as long.  Try to avoid logos on clothing too because you can’t Photoshop them out of video very easily.

    Ok, enough of my musings.  I’m sure I’ll have more to say on this as 2011 evolves.  I just wanted to give you my take on what may be coming up down the road so you can keep these thoughts in mind as you move about the world in 2011.

    Footage Topics for Photographers to Consider

    At a recent program on Stock Footage, there was a panel from several stock agencies, each with their own presentation showing how their clients were using motion clips.  The following is a listing of topics that I jotted down while the clips whizzed by.  The variety of subjects here exemplifies just how wide open the subject matter is:

    Toddlers walking Water fountains Car problems
    Playground Traffic Fresh fruit picked
    Soccer Beg Ben Energy turbines
    Stadium Thames River Times Square
    Horse jumping Sidewalk cafes Floating markets
    Bicycle race Signs Arches
    Speedboat Venice gondolas Sedona
    Race cars Light bulb Family
    Skidoo Supertankers Parenting
    Sailboat Cruise ships Teens
    Surfboard Organic food/farmers Dancing
    Rafting Baskets of produce Jogging
    Heli skiing Jump roping Horseback riding
    Running in fields Bathing People
    Rushing river Camping Surgery
    Aerials Carnival Swimming
    Glaciers Sprinklers with kids Signing
    Clouds Couple/waves/beach Shopping
    Speeding train Cranes lifting/building site Ipod music listening
    Waterfalls Relaxation Relaxation/resort
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    Posted by Dave in Shooting Tips, Stock Footage || Comment Now ||
  • Dave’s Footage Update

    Monday, December 27, 2010

    Greetings Photographers and budding Videographers!

    Footage is a hot topic these days as the stock photography industry struggles to keep pace with the rapidly evolving needs of the new digital landscape.  Danita and I recently exhibited at the Visual Connections event for photo buyers and attended the Picture Archive Council of America 15th International Meeting: Focus on Motion, where we were able to speak with both users and providers of footage.

    At Visual Connections we talked with a number of textbook publishers and discussed their upcoming plans to incorporate footage in their new products.  This is still a very new area for the editors and it was difficult for them to describe their upcoming needs with much clarity.  However, they all agreed that they are starting to use it more frequently and that with the changes they see evolving in current projects, that adding motion to their offerings is happening now and will accelerate in the near future.

    The textbook editors didn’t have a shopping list of what they need or what is difficult to find.  Yet when we described what we are encouraging our photographers to shoot, they were in agreement with what we have been saying for some time – anything that moves in reality is a potential subject for a footage clip in an educational product.  The potential shoot list is so large that no one has attempted it!  And the timeframe for when a particular subject will be needed is hard to predict.  Therefore, we stick by what we have been telling you for some time:  Whenever you are shooting, double your potential output from the shooting opportunity by capturing both stills and motion.

    At the PACA meeting we were shown the latest digital magazines by Conde Nast Vice President Drew Schutte.  Most of the digital versions of magazines are simply the same magazine pages formatted to be viewed on a computer screen.   You can see the large number of magazines with digital editions already available at various sites such as emagazine.com.  Conde Nast feels differently.  They believe that the iPad and its quickly arriving imitations will create a significant shift in a large part of how consumers will “read” magazines.  In addition to offering entertaining sounds and video, they also provide an opportunity to drill deeper into a subject with supplemental information.  The products have very high production value, and high production cost.  Most of the material in them is being shot on assignment as there is little stock available that matches the rather spectacular topics they are offering in their introductory issues.

    As Wired puts it, “The tablet is our opportunity to make the Wired we always dreamed of. It has all the visual impact of paper, enhanced by interactive elements like video and animated infographics. We can offer you a history of Mars landings that lets you explore the red planet yourself. We can take you inside Trent Reznor’s recording studio and let you listen to snippets of his work in progress. And we can show you exactly how Pixar crafted each frame of its new movie, Toy Story 3.

    To deliver this rich reading environment, we’re using new digital publishing technology developed by Adobe. The yearlong effort, spearheaded by Wired creative director Scott Dadich, will allow us to simultaneously create both the print magazine and the enhanced digital version with the same set of authoring and design tools.

    The arrival of the tablet represents a grand experiment in the future of media. Over the next few months, we’ll integrate social media and offer a variety of versions and ways to subscribe in digital form. We’ll learn through experimentation, and we will watch closely as our readers teach us how they want to use tablets.

    There is no finish line. Wired magazine will be digital from now on, designed from the start as a compelling interactive experience, in parallel with our print edition. Wired is finally, well, wired.

    Unlike the simple digital re-presentation of print magazines, I view this as an entirely new use for photography and video.  Conde Nast disagrees and is trying to get licensing rights for their new iPad version of Wired and their other iPad offerings included in the regular print edition license, and for an unlimited timeframe!  This is totally unrealistic and the audience members, including me, let them know in no uncertain terms that we loved the new product and that it was not going to be covered as a free add-on to their license agreements.

    As most stock footage is being created for the traditional “lifestyle” stock market, there is quite a lot of expense outlay for an uncertain revenue stream.  These types of shots usually require a studio, models, lights, and tons of other equipment.  Your mission is significantly easier!  Just double shoot with your DSLR (or even a small HD Video camera) whenever you are on a shoot and see a suitable subject.  Just be sure to follow the few basic guidelines we have mentioned before.  The following excerpt from the notes taken by Pat Hunt of Huntstock at the PACA panel discussion on video (with my pithy commentary inserted) reiterate why most stock photographers find it so hard to shoot footage and how your mission to supply us with footage clips is so much easier!

    Use of the storyboard can be the biggest challenge from the beginning. Going to a shoot with a thorough brief is a key to success. Bill Miles likes to explain that, “you have to learn how dumb you are.” Understanding the equipment and directing the talent and crew are skills that have to be acquired.(Let’s skip this step as it need not apply to you) He recommends hiring a cameraperson skilled in motion equipment to start, as they can be cost effective, and allow you time to properly conceptualize and direct. (Ever direct a lake, building, or maybe a salmon?) He also explains that, “a lot of talent may not be good at acting. You have to watch them like a hawk. There are 100 things that can mess up a clip.” (Duh! But not with our subject matter!) Smooth camera movements and a lack of trademark logos in the images are constant issues that separate the pro from the amateur. (Simple but very true and extremely important!) How you see motion in a frame and how you see space and subtleties may offer high production value. (This just takes a little practice.  I did it and so can you.).

    What equipment is acceptable for professional production is always the first thing on the minds of image producers about to make the change. According to Lisa, Image Source demands that all production be done on HD. There is a small list of cameras they accept, including the Red, the Sony EX cameras, the Canon 5D, and 7D, along with the 60D and 550D, and also the Panasonic P2 series. (Your Canon and Nikon DSLRs will do just fine if you work within their limitation and feature their strengths)Thought Equity, on the other hand, will take any format and their decisions depend on the content of the footage. They say there are as many as 80 file formats that need transcoding. (We are skipping this headache and so can you with our simple guidelines.) Issues that most concern Thought Equity are exclusivity of content, and rights & restrictions, making the content as accessible to client use as possible. (We need those model and property releases when appropriate, but you already got those for the stills, right?)

    The Red camera is very technical and the image quality has very large files sizes. It only offers raw files at production, which are not easy to view on the computer screen. The 5D is excellent for immediate screen viewing, but more restrictive for motion and pulling focus. On the other hand, production costs go up a lot with the Red and the revenue in price per clip will be the same. Photographers have to decide with they can afford, as, according to Alan of Rubberball, it can cost from $50,000 to $100,000 to outfit yourself in the Red and under $10,000 for the 5D.

    What is the return revenue for this business? There still seems to be a lot of speculation on this matter, as the industry is still growing. However, Alan Bailey says they have an inventory of 5500 clips now and they are commanding about twice the revenue per clip as the still imagery. However, it can be two years before one gets a return on investment. Rubberball hopes to be producing content that will be relevant for ten to fifteen years out. Alan aptly reviews the pros and cons to making the move to motion:

    Pros – It’s still an unsaturated market, and there are tons of holes to fill. The global transition is happening; the market is growing; there are more technological options; and the cannibalization by amateurs is less likely.

    Cons – It’s harder to create good content; and talent is difficult to direct. It’s almost impossible to Photoshop out logos (let Adnet do it – see below) ; and your storage requirements are much higher. Also there is no clear standardization on delivery format. (One size fits all for us)

    These challenges will seem like the cost of doing business for some and insurmountable for others. It’s key to know your strengths, your niche areas for success and your ability to endure change and innovation as you chase the technology of the future.”

    If in doubt about any of the above, please give me a call.  I just used my 5D to create a web infomercial and did the editing myself in Final Cut Express on a MacBook.  Keep it simple and create clips with little effort that will sell for years to come.  It is not too late to get into the game!

    So, there you have it!  Got any other excuses?  If not, send us those clips.  If you do, give me a call at 425-562-1543 to discuss how to overcome your concerns.

    Dave

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    Posted by Dave in Stock Footage || Comment Now ||
  • A Treasure Trove of HDLSR Resources!

    Tuesday, November 30, 2010

    A huge tip of the cap goes out to dslrvideoshooter.com for compiling this wonderful and comprehensive list of resources for DSLR users. Check out some of these sites to get the latest news, reviews and inspiration! And be sure to keep us on your radar as well! Enjoy.

    Blogs

    Philip Bloom - Now known as a leader in the HDSLR revolution, Philip Bloom has a lot of knowledge to share on his very popular blog.
    Planet 5D - Videos, news and more.
    DSLR News Shooter - DSLR News Shooter is dedicated to the use of the latest HDSLRs like the Canon Eos 5DmkII, 7D and Nikon D300s for news, documentary and factual shooting.
    Hurlbut Visuals - Shane Hurlbut shares knowledge on using HDSLR for filmmaking.
    FreshDV - Industry news, reviews and training resources for HDSLR users.
    Negative Spaces Blog - Ben Cain tests DSLRs and shares some tips on how to use them.
    Vincent Laforet’s Blog - Vincent is another leader in the DSLR revolution and is continually pushing these cameras to create captivating images.
    Cinema 5D News – Daily news feed for DSLR filmmakers.
    Wiegaertner Films – Sebastian Wiegärtner shares info, teaches HDSLR workshops and much more.
    DSLR HD - Blog with a interesting series called: Why You Should Not Shoot Video With A DSLR.
    ProLost - Stu share info on color correction, cameras and the like.
    Learning DSLR Video - Best blog for beginning HDSLR users. Dave explores shooting video on DSLRs and shares findings.
    No Film School - Home of The DSLR Cinematography Guide.
    Canon Filmmakers - One of the first kids on the DSLR-for-film block.
    DSLR Cinematography - News, reviews and tutorials for DSLR filmmakers.
    El Skid’s Blog – Robin Schmidt’s killer blog on filmmaking, HDSLR filmmaker and more.
    Nino Film - Commercial and documentary shooting with a stellar blog.
    A 550D User’s Blog – Michael Schmidt shares links, videos and more.
    7D Pro - Designed simply to provide an online presence for Canon EOS DSLR users
    Wide Open Camera – Tests, giveaways and great information for HDSLR users.
    Cheesy Cam – If your interested in DIY and DSLRs this is the blog for you.
    FStoppers – Information pertaining to professional photography of all kinds.
    Tom Guilmette – Sports and nature shooter who is always sharing tips and tricks.
    DV Culture – Online platform focused on Digital Video News, Product Reviews.
    Phil Hoyt – Sharing info on HDSLRs, gear and more.
    Digital SLR Shooter – Blog on Hybrid shooting and video production.
    Scene Blog – A Blog by Filmmakers For Filmmakers.
    Daniel Freytag’s Blog – DSLR related blog content.
    Need Creative – For those who are passionate about HDSLRs, Macs and other visual tech.
    Next WaveDV – The Next wave of digital video.
    5D Mark II Team – Improvements and Gear.

    Podcasts

    The C47iTunes – Learn lighting, shooting, and post workflow from a DSLR user.
    16×9 Cinema | iTunes – The home of Carl Olson’s ”Digital Convergence Podcast” and blog where he shares information, resources, and interviews industry professionals.
    Crossing the 180 | iTunes – Ron Dawson interviews filmmakers and talk about DSLRs in production.
    My DSLR Show – weekly web series for filmmakers using DSLR cameras.
    RED CentreiTunes – Wait… RED??? Yes, but lately Mike Seymour and Jason Wingrove cover a lot of DSLR topics and info.

    Forums

    EOS HD - Forum and blog sharing news and videos.
    Cinema5D - International HDSLR Forum with a great community.
    DVX User – Its a DVX user blog with HDSLR info to boot!
    Creative Cow – Creative Community of DSLR Users.

    Vimeo Groups

    Cinemacuteo Free Film School.
    DSLR Cinema.
    Canon DLSR Video Users Group.
    DSLR Filmmakers Group.
    Canon EOS 7D.

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  • Learn FINAL CUT EXPRESS 4 with Izzy Video Tutorials

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010

    ATTN: Footage Shooters!

    There is a free set of tutorials for Final Cut Express 4 available online done by Izzy Hyman.  There are 9 lessons with a total of 2.5 hours of tutorial.  A few of us in the office went through these tutorials and learned almost everything we needed to know for submitting quality edited clips.  It breaks down the editing process and color correction in a few short and easy to follow segments, and even teaches a lot of keyboard shortcuts to further simplify post-production.

    You can find this tutorial and many others at: www.izzyvideo.com

    The Final Cut Express tutorial is on the products page at http://www.izzyvideo.com/learn-final-cut-express/ and just follow the instructions on the page. The tutorial is available to download in it’s entirety in the zip file called Learn_FCE.zip.  Also download the sample videos  from the link at the Chapter 1 table of contents called ch01media.zip.  He uses these clips to create a fully rendered video and you learn by watching the tutorials in QuickTime, while copying what he does step by step in Final Cut Express!

    This is a very powerful and useful tool for our mac users! Take a look and start editing… Good Luck!

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    Posted by Dave in Processing, Software, Stock Footage, Workshops || 1 comment ||
  • Footage Seminar Postponed

    Wednesday, March 31, 2010

    We are very sorry to announce that our upcoming series of Footage seminars, scheduled to begin on April 5th, have been suddenly postponed. Our web broadcast service Creative Techs has taken on a new owner and changed their name to Creative Live. They are also re-evaluating their upcoming curriculum and are unable to give us a new start time for the series, or even acknowledge that they will honor their commitment to us for the broadcasts.

    9 days before our first class was scheduled to start, we received an email from owner Craig Swanson as follows:

    “I’m sorry to do this. …there are some big changes coming up for our classroom in April.  Chase Jarvis is now a co-owner of our online classroom, and we’re having to adjust some schedules around some big events that he is part of rolling out.”

    Needless to say, this unprofessional behavior is unacceptable to us and we are now looking for alternative ways to conduct and deliver the seminars. We will let you all know as soon as suitable arrangements have been made.

    In the meantime, please don’t stop shooting and submitting your footage! If you have not yet started, talk with Danita or Jeff Lawrence about how to submit your clips. The web site is still going live with footage on April 5th as originally planned and we are adding clips as soon as they are ready.

    While we were hoping to save the following announcement for our April 12th seminar on editing footage, we are pleased to announce that we have made arrangements to provide our photographers with extremely reasonable pricing on post production of footage clips! Remember when you used to send your film in for processing? Well now that same convenience is available for editing your footage clips! Just send in raw footage in clips of 60 seconds or less and you will get back time edited, color corrected, and keyworded clips ready for submission to us for immediate uploading. And if you need special effects like zooming or panning added in post, this too can be done at low cost. Just contact us for pricing.

    We hope this hasn’t caused you any inconvenience. We’ll keep you posted!

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    Posted by Dave in Stock Footage, Workshops || Comment Now ||
  • Save the Date – Stock Footage Webinar

    Thursday, March 11, 2010
    Photo by Larry Ditto / Danita Delimont.com

    Photo © Larry Ditto / DanitaDelimont.com

    Although shooting video with DSLR cameras may be intimidating and confusing at first we feel that with the right guidance and information everyone can learn to embrace it and produce quality footage. As we have been moving into the footage market over the past few months we have come across many experts, useful tools, software and hardware that have proven to be very valuable. We are encouraging all of our still shooters to get into this new market and we now can show you how to do so with just a short learning curve and a modest investment in gear.

    We are pleased to announce that DanitaDelimont.com will be presenting a FREE 5 week online footage course for our contracted photographers starting April 5th.  Each Monday classes will be streamed live online from the Creative Techs classroom at Art Wolfe’s studio in Seattle and will also be available later for downloading from the Creative Techs website.


    The program is titled “Producing Great Stock Footage with Your DSLR”. Each week we will tackle different topics and will have various experts and product representatives leading the discussions. We will be updating you as the schedule is finalized, but be sure to mark Monday, April 5th at 11:00 AM Pacific time and the following four Mondays on your calendar.  There are also seats available in the studio audience so if you are in Seattle, please attend the live session!

    We look forward to helping you get acquainted with shooting and processing footage.  Let us help you to add a great new revenue stream to your business with much less effort than you ever imagined!

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  • Canon EOS 550D (Rebel T2i) Announced

    Thursday, February 18, 2010

    EOS Rebel T2i EF-S

    Canon recently announced it’s newest DSLR with 1080p footage capabilites, the Rebel T2i. This is the most advanced Rebel to hit the market so far, and should be a great addition to the family of Hybrid Footage/Still DSLRs.

    Specs:

    - 18 Megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor
    - DIGIC 4 processor with ISO 100-6400 (Expansion to 12800)
    - Continuous shooting at 3.7fps
    - Full HD movie recording with manual control and selectable frame rates
    - 7.7cm (3.0”) 3:2 Clear View LCD with 1,040k dots
    - iFCL metering System with 63-zone Dual-layer Metering Sensor
    - Quick Control screen to change shooting settings
    - Exposure compensation +/-5 stops (although viewfinder scale is still +/-2 stops)
    - Select maximum value for Auto ISO
    - External Microphone socket
    - Movie crop function
    - Eye-Fi connected functions compatibility
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    Posted by Dave in Cameras, Canon, Stock Footage || Comment Now ||